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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 116 (some duplicates have been removed)
also add religion to the list with some significant firsts. the first buddhist senator, the only nontheist believing in the absence or rejection of god is in the house, and the first hindu and only unitarian universalist. joining me now is democratic congressman keith ellison of minnesota. representative, always good to see you here. >> thank you. glad to be on. >> you know, as many know you were the first muslim elected to congress yet islam in america goes back more than a century. >> yes. >> that could be said of many of the religions i was just mentioning here. why do you think this is the era that people like this are finally being elected? >> well, i think it is because people are participating, people are engaged in our democratic process. america is more open and tolerant than it ever has been in its history and i think that folks want to be part of this great american experiment. i mean, america started out great for religion. it said congress shall make no law establishing religion nor bridge the free exercise thereof. also it said there is no religious test to hold off
, this organized religion. he is not ready to, you know, get organized religion. he is fascinated by the concept that there is somebody called god-- which happens to us. it happened to me in childhood. i used to wait for the time when-- for the time of prayer i used to wait and i used to cry. you know, who is god? >> rose: this is where pi begins the journey. he were it is. this is our first scene. ♪ ♪ >> my name is pi. i have been in a shipwreck. i am on a lifeboat alone with a tiger. please send help. >> rose: what's happening in that scene? >> well, it's just like-- it's very hard to fin to define god. it is very hard to define what tiger is to pi. there are the obstacles of the beast. there's, you know, pi, the inner beast, the crouching tiger, so to speak, in him. so in the spiritual moment, in the hopelessness, his looking at his opponent, but at the same time, himself, the fearful tiger and also the truth of his own self, and this is the moment before he revealed himself to god, not religious god, but god in the abstract sense. as you can see, the water is like mirror. it's very refl
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded in the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestant. by the 20th century catholic, jewish but important role a culture 190000 so fundamentally protestant and even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, ma, which causes the last given from god to defeat all in bubbles upward to the rulers. kids says the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to peer, my stands in stark opposition to every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law and which the law. germany and england had come them off for a while but by the 20 century, both have more or less abandoned it, germany more so than england. their further the end of world war ii, when europe unloaded, however unwillingly its colony, those colonies themselves to find and print process of the law. thus the first of pillars taken together means that a christian, protestant religion influence and shape everything about ameri
ordered they look into natives religion and psychological records and medical records to make the case for punishing the student and kick him out. hated was little upset to sell in protest he made a collage dish to be put on facebook no blood for oil, and once the stock was falling down on the job named it the zechariah parking dried j. and the president thought this would be his legacy. he was already looking for excuses to take him out. he flips the note to undo the door to say with the call why should it is proof he was a clear and present danger to the campus. [laughter] and if anybody really wants to think he was day threat to but they did not leave even was the threat. you do not slip a note under the door. [laughter] so that case opens the book. so what was spectacular is what i have got used to. i also talked at length about the university of delaware as one of the most invasive programs i have never seen. and to be on the right side of history they defend it to this day with mandatory programs to stand on one wall if you have this a bid and so security security, affirmative-ac
another mormon date, so there's lds singles.com. for christians the majority religion in the u.s., there's christian mingle. you probably have seen the commercials. even muslims are on the hunt for a date. muslima.com is one of the more popular sites. finding a partner of the same faith is important to many jewish-americans, so they use j date and the site talks about its results. >> different sides of the country. >> here we are madly in love with two kids later, and if it wasn't for j date, we never would have met. >> going on j-date led to this amazing life that i have. >> i knew by the second date. >> i know you heard a baby. you thought is that baby somewhere? yes, her name is willa. she's here with her parents, jason and melissa. they met on j-date, married last year, had the baby, willa. hello, willa. thank you for joining us this morning. both of you, thank you. tell us about the importance of finding a date -- good morning. about finding love and the importance of religion in finding that. >> i grew nup a very traditional jewish household, and it was very important to me to pass
president. he knew a lot about medicine, architecture and religion and sdins. he created the first swivel chair. he had racy affairs throughout his life. thomas jefferson, the art of power, he tells his story in luscious detail. since we couldn't book jefferson to talk to us because he's not among the living, we have the next best thing in the guest spots today, jon meachem. welcome. you how are you? >> thank you. i haven't seen schoolhouse rock in a long time. that's great. >> i watch it every day. listen, thomas jefferson and obama. lots of similarities. we've noted some. there's policy ideas, too, in there. what do you think that thomas jefferson -- -- deep-rooted anger. i didn't put the deep-rooted anger. we know how i feel about saying that about obama. what do you think that thomas jefferson could teach obama going into the second term? >> i think the main thing is you actually have to like or at least pretend you like other people in washington. i think that's the main one. every night when congress was in session, jefferson would have lawmakers down to dinner. he didn't mix partie
is about religion. big foot, yeti, it's often a punch line. people are incredibly skeptical. >> you get punched if you say a joke about stuff around me. >> reporter: like we said, that are really into bigfoot. never mind the fact that the only thing anyone knows for sure about the legendary beast is that it has been wildly successful at filling tabloids, being the subject of terrible b movies. and generally serving as an all-around punch line. >> about what height did you see these guys? >> they were up higher than your hand. >> that's a big boy. >> reporter: matt moneymaker and his team are real life bigfoot hunters. with every bit of cutting edge technology, night vision gear and sensors, they can get their hands on, the group travels the world investigating bigfoot sightings. why are people fascinated by bigfoot. >> well, first, it's more than one. it's not bigfoot, it's bigfoots. there's a misconception that we're looking for one thing. >> reporter: their adventures make up two and soon to be three seasons of the animal planet show, "finding bigfoot." why is there no good fee toe of
. michael kors 6. select comfort 7. true religion 8. vera bradley and, 9. birks & mayors in the ipo market this week, paper company boise cascade hopes to raise up to $200 million in its ipo. the public offering may have traders watching office max. shares of office max spiked 27% on friday due to the large stake it holds in boise cascade. meanwhile, wi-fi company ruckus wireless had a shaky first day in the markets. the stock fell 4% following its ipo. and, watch for alon usa partners, which hits the market this week. the oil refinery company is pricing in between 19 and 21 dollars. if your flock plans on eating an organic, free-range, specially- fed bird, here's one. this big bird could set you back $335. the heritage turkey farm in virginia is reporting brisk sales of the 20-pound birds. it may sound like they were raised at the waldorf, but the birds are really just given sufficient space and nutritous feed. some chefs say the superior taste simply doesn't compare to super-market brands, while other chefs say the key to the best tasting bird is how you prepare it. nintendo is already s
facing the jewish community, from religion and culture to politics and business. >> it's been a dream of ours to have the kind of gathering to show off for baltimore and also to engage with our friends and colleagues from around the country. >> once a year time when everybody gets a chance to sit together and sit, not just listen, but to talk with one another and what's going on positive in communities, but also how people are struggling and how they can learn from other communities. >> with israel to mark its 65th birthday next year, there is a lot on the table for this gathering, finding a temporary home in baltimore, which serves as a base for one the strongest jewish communities in the u.s. >> and next month governor o'malley will travel to israel for the third time. this time he says he's taking his son. >> now, your 11 that weather plus forecast with meteorology john collins. >> really nice today. didn't make it to 70 degrees, but very, very nice. cold front coming out to the west. that's responsible for the nice conditions we've had, because the southerly flow ahead of that fro
. it will examine the most impressing issues facing the jewish religion today. another big convention in baltimore. the u.s. conference of catholic bishops opened their general assembly today. church leaders said it will not change their strategy of the marriage are birth control despite the outcome of the election. maryland is one of four states that voted to legalize gay marriage. tomorrow the bishops considers making a statement on the economy. >> people gathered to pay tribute to our veterans in the third annual veterans parade that began on charles street at 10:00 this morning. several organizations were involved, including the buffalo soldiers and members of the rotc. those who fought in wars past said they were pleased with the turnout and enjoyed reminiscing with fellow veterans. >> just reminisce. go back in memories and think of all the ones that did not make it back. >> it gives me a warm feeling inside to know that people still remember. >> very proud of everyone who was actually served and to our guys overseas. i am encouraged and out here supporting them as well. >> today's parade en
represent the christian religion, but actually the supreme court's decision was saying this one in particular really reflects the crosses of u.s. fallen soldiers you see in cemeteries across europe where soldiers fought and lost their lives in the name of freedom and at the end of the day it's not necessarily about religion, but something broader stiblism, harris. >> harris: how about that coming together on veterans day, dominique di-natale, thank you very much. continuing coverage of our fox top story tonight. a statement coming in now, associated press is reporting jill kelly remember the top of the newscast, told you there are now two women involved in different ways, in this scandal that surrounds general david petraeus, who suddenly left the cia, as the head of it on friday. and jill kelly, a family friend of the petraeus family who received threatening e-mails from the computer of a former girlfriend, paula broadwell with whom petraeus was having an affair. jill kelly issued a statement to the associated press acknowledging her friendship with the former cia director and
of people say the crosses represent the christian religion. the supreme court decision says this one in particular reflects the crosses of u.s. fallen soldiers you see in cemeteries where soldiers lost their lives in the name of freedom. it is not necessary about religion. thank you very much. >> this just in. a statement coming in now. associated press is reporting joe kelly. there are now two women involved in different ways in this scandal that surrounds general gave individual petraeus w -- d petraeus who left the cia on friday. jill kelly who received threatening e-mails from the computer of a former girlfriend paula broadwell with whom petraeus was having an affair allegedly. jill kelly issued a statement to the associated press acknowledging her friendship with the former cia director and asking now for privacy. as we have been reporting tonight the family says she p and petraeus had an affair but she received threatening e-mails from broadwell or from broadwell's computer. she contacted them. more than five years they have. >> to the right is the general's wife holly. that is
appreciated talking about religion and i do enjoy the space. we talk about where we don't necessarily have to talk about -- we don't have to defend ourselves against old understandings of what a woman is in the bible. the reality is that we are in a room full of conservative people, we wouldn't go very many minutes in a conversation of women and gender without talking about this. i'm wondering when progressives will meet at conversation. not only does talking about that, but maybe it's not happening and those that actually are talking to it. i think that that is, you know, we got by with this election and not feeling overcome by large religious organizations that have a lot of money, but they are also the ones going right now. those who define religious freedom and in four years from now, i think that is something that we will really need. so when are we going to talk about how to meet at conversation? >> yes, i think that is a really important point. i do believe that for us, working in the lbgt community, we have been dealing with this a lot. all of the laws that are getting past have so
religion, or is it really deep and historical sense of oneness? my own little theory is that it became until recently, people like strom thurmond, the fact that so many white men, historically in this country pulled themselves that they were not the product of race and so this invisibility of the product of race is not the product of the women who must've really wanted them. otherwise it is -- it is very clear that some parts operate at a distance. >> i would also, speaking to your question about whether this is about action or reaction, and of course, i think it is all part of this so that everything is constant in action and reaction -- one thing i want to point to, i think when we talk about these kind of race comments on the contraceptive comments are so outrageous over the past year, we think of it as a republican blood of stupidity. in fact, one of the interesting things is that it was prompted by unusual behavior on the part of the democrats. the democrats, while being the party of women, and about the time -- as soon as they started counting the gender gap, which really wasn't
. i do not think that is religion specific. i think it is across the board. his relationship with israel, the muslim world. host: this is a financial times editorial today. general petraeus has been the mastermind behind using drugs to go after al qaeda in the horn of africa. but has been the world reaction to this kind of military strategy? guest: it's a controversial strategy, no question. the administration has doubled down on the use of drones. there are significantly more than a river were then in the bush administration. there is clearly rationale for some of this, but there are some issues about executive privilege in making some of these decisions. i do not think petraeus is the only person who has been a mastermind. there are many who feel strongly about this. i do not see policy changing, but there's certainly a feeling in pakistan, the horn of africa, and other places. in yemen, it was the morning after obama's victory that there was a draw on strike in yemen -- drone strike. you can call them a surgical strikes, but there are certainly casualties. it's a conversat
's a form of religion. i really believe that. in which you don't have to, you don't have any morality, you just have places to go to worship. [laughter] >> by the way, we're going to -- i'm going to ask one more question, and then we're going to open it up to all of you who i'm sure have lots of questions for tom. finally, tom, after "bonfire of the vanities" you got into a few tiffs with other authors about what real writing is. you guys were particularly nastiest with mailer, updike and irving, referring to that -- if i remember correctly -- as the three stooges. were you just trying to start a fight just to be provocative? there seemed to be a choosing up of sides, and many along the 43rd street corridor at the time new york magazine often cited the scene with mailer and company. do you think this fight has had a negative impact on reviewers of your book? in other words, do you think they use each new book as a chance to get even? >> in a word, yes. [laughter] i couldn't resist. everyone always said never answer a review, it's crazy, it shows you've been hurt, you're sensitive. but i ha
religion and state to celebrate holidays. it is best done on private property. jon property. >> this ends up being about bullies. what iit's about imposing a dynamic that you want to feel as though you belong in a society where you are a minority. and ultimately it's about trying to change the face of the majority to meet you because you can't adapt. i think that this nation is tolerant, and this is about a fully dynamics. >> they are not being bullies, they are asking for the same rights that christian groups had for 50 or 60 years. >> your goal is to push them out. >> tell christian groups to get more aggressive. put in more applications, it's an open process it treats everybody fairly. >> it's not all but,. >> it's not going to be about the dominant religion either. it's about free speech for everybody and freedom for everybody. >> which is brought to you by christianity, by the way. jon: the judge is hearing this case today. we'll see if she comes to some kind of accommodation that makes both sides happy. i don't know it doesn't look good right now. thank you both. jenna: in the meant
reform, war on religion. if you're karl rove, where is our lane we're supposed to swim? on the democratic side it was all about the middle class all the time and that's the focus. >> and attacking mitt romney's record at bain all at time. >> if mitt romney wins, the middle class loses, those two things married up well. >> liz, as someone who is -- zb >> not an apparahchic. >> they bought words u including words economy, dressage. while it's funny, shrewd strategic move speaks to the ethos of two campaigns, the notion there was a sense of humor the obama campaign understood, a way of poking fun at mitt romney that was quietly devastating. mitt romney never had that on his side. no way to be funny or clever about president obama. >> the left has the fun. and you guys were awesome. but there was also, i'm going to toot my own horn, because we came up with this actually campaign where we had rosy perez and all of these people having fun. i did crazy videos not safe for work that were like in your face like this is what happens when you have a transvaginal thing if you don't want to get f'd, v
their religion trumps their commitment to journalism. that's atrocious and beneath rupert murdoch. >>> it is now clear luke russert has some of his brass. when nancy pelosi said she was staying on as minority leader, he asked a question related to her age and she didn't like it one bit. >> some of your colleagues privately say your decision to stay on prohibits the party from having a younger leadership and will be hurt the party long term. what's your response. >> you always ask that question, except to mitch mcconnell. i think what you will see, and let's for a moment honor it as a legitimate question, although it's quite offensive. >> i'm sorry, congresswoman, it was a legitimate question and russert asked it respectfully. >>> speaking of questions, president obama was wrapping up his white house news conference when bloomberg tried to send it into overtime. >> thank you very much. >> most of the conversations -- >> that was a great question, but it would be a horrible precedent for me to answer your question just because you yelled it out. so thank you very much, guys. >> nice try, but obama
it,y. >> i think that president, -- like a religion for the left, the rates have to go up, i hate to say this, they want to raise those rates even if though i know it is going to harm the economy, this is an article of faith with them, but republicans havene card they can play if they have the guts, that is to go forward with the spending cuts, the republicans are supposed to be party of limited government, and less spending, what is wrong with 5 or 6 or 8% cutback in the government programs? that is seduled. >> 100% agree there. neil: there you go a multitrillion dollar game of chicken. >> that is good for the economy. >> get rid of government spending. >> cut government spending! neil: okay, you buck seem upset. -- you both seem upset. neilthank you very much. >> thank you. >> all right. weave been getting a lot of tweets how we've been covering this phys cal fiscal mess, and r this phys cal fiscal mess, and r thou 4g lte is the fastest. so, which peast 4g lte service would yochoose, based on this chart ? don't rush intit, i'm not looking r the fastest answer. obviously verizon
religion. >> hmm. general james "spider" marks joining us this morning. thank you, sir. we certainly appreciate it. nice to see you. >> sure. >> still ahead this morning on "starting point" when veterans return home they often face an uphill battle trying to return to civilian life but there's a method of meditation that could help them. we're dealing with post traumatic stress. russell simmons is our guest up next. ♪ 100% greek. 100% mmm... ♪ oh wow, that is mmm... ♪ in fact it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calories. well ok then, new yoplait greek 100. it is so good. ♪ it is so good. alriwoah! did you get that? and...flip! yep, look at this. it takes like 20 pictures at a time. i never miss anything. isn't that awesome? uh that's really cool. you should upload these. i know, right? that is really amazing. the pictures are so clear. kevin's a handsome devil that phone does everything! search dog tricks. okay, see if we can teach him something cool. look at how lazy kevin is. kevin, get it together dude cmon, kevin take 20 pictures with burst shot on the galax
a lot about religion but one milestone was overlooked. hawaii made tulsi gabbard the first hindu congresswoman. representative elect gabbard joins us now from new york. good morning. >> thank you for having me this morning. >> we're excited to have you here. how does it feel? >> thank you so much. i'm excited and ready to get to work. >> you have a lot of work to do, too, let me tell you. >> yes. >> but let's talk about your religion because, you know, a lot of us think that it's pretty cool to have a hindu in congress for the first time. do you feel like you're something unusual? >> you know, i'm actually very proud and i'm proud especially of the people of hawaii and to come from a place as special as hawaii because not only did they make the choice to elect me, the first hindu member of congress, but also elected the first buddhist member of the u.s. senate. and in hawaii, hindu and buddhists are a majority in faith within the community but it shows the respect, diversity, and love and aloha that people have in hawaii to allow for something like this to happen. >> normally we
abortion, you have to right to face for abortion rights, go for it. religion, the more women are sub gated. women are raised as institutionalized sexism. no one think to say point out that things are sexist. we grow used to it. women are indoctrinated into this feeling that they are second place citizens and men who want to get inside of those bodies get to dictate what happens to those bodies if they do. >> caller: i wouldn't dare get into a conversation about religion. it's up to them and i don't want to interfere with that. and i believe in everybody's right to do that, no matter how fundamentalist. >> amen. >> caller: but the trouble is that there are plenty of women and men who believe that women should not have these rights who aren't particularly religious. >> exactly. that's true. >> caller: who aren't particularly, you know, who don't go to church every sunday and don't, you know, belong to an evangelical congress degree allegation. >> stephanie: i think it also didn't, you know, resonate with people, they are saying small government, the best bumper sticker, government small enou
of religion that they were pushing by the federal government. federal reserve. it a monster then and now. when the country was created in 1776 up to the time of the federal reserve. the value of the dollar went up. and since the federal reserve it is down 92 percent. they crank out free money. >> thanks for the pick me up, judge. federal income tax. >> the federal income tax. money is the mother's milk of politicings. under wilson and roosevelt they taxed incomes and it gave the federal government an unending spickot of cash and started the bloating bercracy. >> gretchen: and end with regulation and we know what they are . they are abundant. good luck on the book. >> i am taking a break for a year. >> gretchen: you deserve it. check out the new book. >> gretchen: he had his sites set on president obama. he was convicted in a botched bomb plot . darth vader really his dad home from war. >> yeah. it is. daddy. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i heard this news about a multivitamin study looking at long-term health benefits for men over 50. the one they used in that study... centrum silv
with our long history and pluralization of american religions. >> so tell us a bit about that history. why is it okay to joke about jesus but not other religious figures? >> the sacred is much more in contest here in part because of our legacy of religious freedom, but in part because we've had a long history of conflict over sacred imagery and words, often violent conflict. and in more recent years because of the rise of secularism, because of the rise of the culture of mockery in part, as well. it's just become more acceptable. >> is it because more and more of us are agnostic? i mean, why is it? is it -- do we still believe in jesus yet we joke about him? is it the other way around? >> well, it's funny if you read the comments on our cnn belief blog, you'll see that people are engaging in arguments with each other saying our argument has but humor is the way we deal with these kinds of conflicts. and as we say in the piece, in part, it's our way we don't kill each other. >> well, interestingly, i was talking to one of the employees here at cnn, kathy, and she said her minister, she belo
the world and to present a different notion of america. i don't think that that is religion specific. i think that's across the board , his relationship with israel, his relationship with the muslim world. host: this is a "financial times" editorial today. rethink on drones after petraeus exit. general petraeus has been the master mind behind using deprones to go after al qaeda in the horn of africa, etc. what has been the world reaction to these -- this type of mill tear strategy. guest: the administration has doubled down on thes you of drones. there are hundreds more than there ever were in the bush administration. there's clear security rationale for some of them. there are certainly issues. the administration's execity -- executive privilege in making these decisions. i don't think petraeus was the only person who has been the master mind. this has been -- there are many figures in the administration that feel strongly about this. i don't see the policy changing. but there is certainly a feeling in pakistan, especially, in the horn of africa and other places new york yemen, it was
allowing a situation to deter youruate further and further a religion bore that will create more and more hatred and inability of the country to come together again? i am worried that we are not capable. we seem to be not capable at this moment to use the kind of zip sei -- diplomacy i think would be highly desirable top find buy to bring russia to work out a deal with us to find solution to go forward instead of saying no, no, no, and no again. so i think -- i just want to make the point that paula also made as wonderful as, you know, the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with just tools. we will need to confront these situations, and i think the moment is here where it is overdue, it is extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge
changes -- than those who seek power and force others to obey their commands? why does the use of religion to support a social gospel and preemptive wars both which require authoritarians to use violence or the threat of violence go unchallenged? aggression and forced redistribution of wealth has nothing to do with the teachings of the world's grea religions. why do we allow the government and the federal reserve to disseminate false information dealing with economic and foreign policy? why is democracy held in such high esteem when it's the enemy -- when it's the enemy of the minoritynd makes all rights relative to the dictatesf the majority? why should anyone be surprised that congress has no credibility since there's such a disconnect between what politiciansay and what they do? is there any explanation for all the deception, the unhappiness, the fear of the future, the loss of confidence in our leaders, the distrust and anger and frustration? yes, there is. and there's a way to reverse these attitudes. the negative perceptions are logical and a consequence of bad policies bringing abou
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 116 (some duplicates have been removed)